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How to make 'worn' metal...

  1. #1
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    May 2005
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    Hanford, CA

    How to make 'worn' metal...

    Ive been using this technique on my heavy stubber and a sponson mounted heavy bolter, and It works just great. Use this technique when you want to make very worn out or grimey metal.
    (I would post some pix showing the steps in progress, I but I accidently left my starter pot of boltgun metal open for a night. )

    1) Prime the mini (doesnt really matter which color you use)
    2) Paint the metal area you want to look 'grimey' with boltgun metal
    3) Stipple on some Brazen brass (or beaten copper, or tin bitz) randomley around the boltgun metal area
    4) Give it a shitload of 50/50 black/ vermin brown washes, and finally a 'pure' vermin brown wash
    I used it on this heavy stubber dude and this sponson mounted heavy bolter, and It looks great.

    (the Aquila thingey was painted later)
    Any thoughts, constructive criticism, or ideas are welcome.

  2. #2
    aceofchaos
    Guest
    i just paint the area chaos black and give it a heavy drybrush of boltgun metal

  3. #3
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    Ace, that makes it look more burnt. My approach gives the metal an old, slightly rustey or grimey appearance.

  4. #4
    Member Vespire's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
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    Ontario
    Your method would work better, Slick, if you added more spots. Your spots are small and low in quantity, and doesn't give as much grime as ye want.

    But otherwise, GWREAT!
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    Add em up, don't be shy =]

  5. #5
    CRasterImage
    Guest
    For Dirty Metal, get yourself some smoke. I don't mean that kind, I mean a product from Tamiya paints called "smoke". It is an off-black glaze. When applied over a boltgun metal base coat, it looks wonderful. Creates an oily, dirty metal look.

    Here are some pics. (scroll to the bottom)
    http://www.brushthralls.com/MetalMayhem/index.php

    Specificly, these are the steps I do:
    - basecoat boltgun metal
    - wash with thinned black ink to accentuate the sculpt
    - drybrush or layer generously with boltgun. (the ink will have darkened the basecoat)
    - drybrush or layer highlights with mithril silver.
    - glaze with smoke.

    The glaze will darken the metal a bit, so factor that in.

    One thing I have not tried is thinning smoke down and trying to use it as an ink.

  6. #6
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    CRaster, please stop putting off-topic stuff in my tutorials. This is for grimey, worn out metal. The pix I saw from 'smoke' look relitivley clean and well kept, like what you'd see on a car engine. My method looks like its been through battle for a long time, and has been mis-used and neglected. Not a car engine... *Willey mutters to himself angriley*

    Edit: Although putting 'smoke' on my worn out metals last would add to the overall 'look', Im still kina irritated that you copied those warmachine people for metals... there methods pretty good, but it still looks 'cleaner' and well-kept. Not the look im going for...
    Last edited by SlickWilly; 19th Jul 05 at 12:30 AM.

  7. #7
    An intresting method i have discovered to creating worn metal is this.
    1) Drybrush bolt-gun metal over chaos black
    2) apply a 50/50 mix of black ink and brown ink (thin with a small quantity of water
    3) highlight with chainmail

    That's it!(complicated, isn't it?)

  8. #8
    CRasterImage
    Guest
    All I am trying to add here is: oily and grimey metal effect.

    It is not a clean black. It is hard to describe.

    Whether it is coated over a nice clean piece of metal (boltgun / mithril) or over an old, rusted and pitted metal (washes of brown) doesn't matter. The point was they oily effect.

    I have only recently learned of this stuff and I felt that it belonged under this catagory, so I posted it here instead of making a seperate post for it. I am sorry if that makes you feel like I am trying to hijack your thread.

    It doesn't matter if the link points to a tutorial that depicts non-GW miniatures. When it comes to painting minis, we are all in the same boat, no matter what product we are painting.

  9. #9
    Raske
    Guest
    I use almost the same thing as Gecko. Black ink, brown ink, water, and a tad of gloss varnish make for a nice misused piece of metal.

  10. #10
    McC4rtn3y
    Guest
    The way I do my aged/worn metal is to first paint tin bitz on, then boltgun metal on top of that, with the tin bitz showing in some places, then I just ink it brown. After that you can highlight with boltgun metal if you want to.

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